Violence at Work

Some workers are at an increased risk of violence either because of where they work, or the type of work that they do. The employer has a legal duty to provide and maintain a safe and healthy workplace, and safe and healthy systems of work. This includes taking all practicable measures to reduce the risk of violence.

Make it safe! Action for health and safety reps

  • Talk with your members, particularly those who have to work alone for at least some of the time, as they may be more vulnerable. Discuss with them their ideas and issues.
  • Ensure an assessment is done to identify risk factors such as: lone working on and off site and other potential hazards.
  • Investigate if jobs can be re-organised to provide a safer system of work, including ensuring there are adequate numbers of staff.
    Download the Workplace Violence Safety Audit (see right hand side of this page) to assist you.
  • Ensure that members report and document all incidents.
  • Raise any concerns or issues of security with your employer as soon as possible.
  • Contact your union for further advice. Many unions have publications and policies on violence. Some examples include:
    • The Australian Nursing Federation - Zero Tolerance Policy.
    • The Ambulance Employees Association of Victoria has issued guidelines for members at risk of violence.

What does the law say?

The employer's duty of care to employees under common law covers more than the work they are doing and workplace conditions to include potential exposure to risk from the foreseeable conduct of third parties.

And more specifically, the employer has a duty under the Victorian Occupational Health and Safety Act (2004)  to provide and maintain for employees, as far as practicable, a working environment that is safe and without risks to health. This includes providing a safe system of work, information, training and supervision. The employer has the duty to take all reasonable steps to reduce the risk to employees. The employer must consult with the OHS reps and the workers in these situations.

WorkSafe has a topic page on Occupational Violence as well as other materials such as:

Who is at risk?

There are large numbers of workers who are potentially at risk of violence from third parties. These include:

  • Police
  • Accident and emergency workers
  • Corrective Service workers
  • Security guards/crowd controllers
  • Car parking attendants
  • Retail workers
  • Health services workers
  • Community sector workers
  • Teachers
  • Hotel workers
  • Contract cleaners
  • and many others, often incidentally, due to having money or goods on premises.

These workers confront or have confronted violent/potentially violent/ drunk/aggressive/drug affected third parties or clients.

See Also:

From the Australian regulatory authorities:

From overseas:

More information and links on this site

Last amended February 2015

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